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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  January 4, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm GMT

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's ham — and these are the main stories this morning: parents are told to worry less about their children spending time looking at screens — as experts say there is little evidence it is harmful to their health. the first x—ray scanner is intalled in a prison in england — as police say there's evidence members of criminal gangs get prison jobs to smuggle in drugs. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen. a couple from northern ireland who won the fourth biggest uk euromillions prize, almost £115 million pounds, say they've written a list of 50 family and friends to share their fortune with. what did you do? i had a cup of tea. a hug and a cup of tea. a hug and a cup of tea, we had quite a big hug! and coming up in our sports bulletin: manchester city reignite the premier league title race, as they beat liverpool 2—1 and reduce their lead at the top of the table.
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good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm annita mcveigh. child health experts have said there is no firm evidence that spending time looking at computer screens and smartphones is harmful to children. in the first official uk guidance, the royal college of paediatrics and child health said no specific time limits should be placed on children's use of screens, but it recommended they should be avoided for an hour before sleep. here's our medical correspondent fergus walsh. young people today grow up surrounded by digital entertainment and information on multiple screens, whether via computer, smartphone, or television. in its guidance to parents, the royal college says the popular view that time in front of a screen
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is toxic to health has essentially no evidence to support it. many things are harmful to us. crossing the road is harmful. even reading, which we think of as a really important thing, actually, is a bit of a sedentary occupation that can keep you up at night. so we think that there is a balance to be struck. there are harms from screens, but actually, screens bring us great opportunities and we have to balance those. it says there are some associations between higher screen use and obesity and depression, but notes that the reported rise in mental health problems among young people was apparent before the advent of social media and digital technologies. it recommends families ask themselves four questions. is screen time in your household controlled? does it interfere with what your family wants to do? does it interfere with sleep? and are you able to control snacking during screen time? the guidance says parents with healthy, active children shouldn't worry greatly
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about computer and smartphone use, although it recommends no screens for an hour before bed, in part because the light can slow the release of the sleep—inducing hormone, melatonin. the royal college says families should negotiate screen time limits with their children based on individual needs, and how much they impact on sleep, physical and social activities. earlier, i spoke to dr max davie, from the royal college of paediatrics and child health — which produced the guidance. what we were aiming was to do was empower parents to make their own informed decisions about screen time. to get families to step back and ask the questions that fergus has outlined about their own screen time. we think a lot of parents would change a few things about the way they use screens if they asked themselves that question. what research and evidence have you looked at? the professor you sawjust now has looked at the whole evidence base for the effects of screen time on health outcomes and
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the conclusions of our guidance is therefore based on his conclusions. someone has tweeted me this morning. he says, who funded the research, and why wasn't the admitted link between children's mental health and screens explored? any answers? it may talk about mental health, this report, does it? in terms of funding, it was the royal college of paediatrics. sean can look at the paper when it comes out and look at the conflict—of—interests. but we are confident that this is independent work. in terms of the link between mental health and screens, there is certainly a link. so, children with poorer mental health use screens more. but that may not be anything to do with the screens causing poor mental health. i think it's more plausible that children with mental health problems find the in—person interactions
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difficult. it is hard, particularly interacting with multiple people, when you're struggling with mental health. retreating into a more hermetic online world is tempting. it has its dangers but it is also a haven. people go to twitter and facebook to connect with people they feel things in common with and sometimes it is a bit of an escape from a difficult situation they may be in. what i have heard about this is the idea that one size does not fit all when it comes to the amount of screen time a child ought to be having. what should parents, as a general rule of thumb, look out for? at what point do they need to say, i should be concerned about this? if you do not feel that screens are under control in your house. that means for younger children, parents controlling. but also for older children, a collective control over what screens are doing — who is using screens and when. parents having control over their own screen use,
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then look at what you do as a family. time spent together in activities in a family is really important for wellbeing. sleep is really important. that is why we have the recommendation of no screens for an hour before bed. exercise is really important. packing all that into a day, there isn't eight hours left to spend on fortnite, generally. lots of you have been responding on twitter to this research. for example, a man who calls himself ‘grumpster‘ says it is advice "in a vacuum" and "is meaningless" as excess social meida has links with mental health issues. dr dominique thompson has welcomed the research, and we'll be speaking to her shortly at ii.30am when we'll be having a live discussion. the first x—ray scanner has been
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installed in a prison in england, as part of the government's programme to reduce drug—related violence. it can detect packages hidden inside a prisoner's body, as our home affairs correspondent danny shaw explains. stand up onto the two black marks. that's it. spin around and face me. just place one hand on to that. using x—ray technology, making prisons safer. this is the first body scanner to be installed as part of the government's programme to reduce drugs and violence in ten of the worst affected prisons in england. nearly finished. it can detect packages hidden inside a prisoner's body. this is an image of an inmate found with concealed drugs on the first day the device was deployed. you can see the straight edges, which shouldn't be inside the human body. the scanner operates in a similar way to a standard hospital x—ray machine, but the level of radiation is 400 times lower. leeds is one of ten prisons that are being given investment to reduce drugtaking and violence
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by next summer. but it's a difficult task and there is no guarantee it will happen. there's also a concern some of the ten prisons could reduce assaults simply by moving violent offenders to otherjails. that's definitely a risk. i'm very, very clear, though, that we need to play this fair. the idea is that i can look other governors in the face and say, we turned around these ten prisons without cheating. the drugs trade is controlled by organised crime groups and there's evidence some criminals deliberately getjobs in prisons to bring contraband in. earlier i spoke to mark fairhurst, who's the national chair of the prison officers' association. he told me he thinks the scanners are a vital resource in the fight against drugs in prisons. it's one of a body of measures that
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we can use to prevent these items coming into ourjails. there are only be ten gels that will have these body scanners but we want them and all the presents. including for staff and visitors. going through these scanners and being said thoroughly like you do at the airport. i also spoke to frances crook, who's the chief executive of the howard league for penal reform. she was more sceptical about whether these scanners will work, unless youre able to scan everyone who's coming into prison. the trouble is that if you're saying it's like an airport, at an airport, everybody is scanned — staff, visitors, everybody. the problem in what they have in leeds is one machine, where they're going to do some of the prisoners, some of the time. so i think we're looking to technology to solve a much more complicated problem and i don't think it's really going to be a big part of the solution. the foreign office has confirmed a former us marine accused of spying in russia is also a british citizen. paul whelan was detained by russian security services a week ago — officials said he was caught "carrying out spying activities." this morning, foreign secretary
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jeremy hunt said british authorities were assisting the us in mr whelan's case. we're not ruling out any theories at all at this stage as to why this might have happened. we are extremely worried about paul whelan. we have offered consular assistance. the us are leading on this because he's british and american citizen. but our position is very, very clear, which is a very straightforward point that individuals should not be used as pawns of diplomatic leverage. we need to see what these charges are against him, understand whether there's a case or not. we're giving every support that we can, but we don't agree with individuals being used in diplomatic chess games because it is desperately worrying not just for the individual, but their families. and we are truly worried about both him and his family as we hear this news. and has britain yet had access to him?
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we have offered access, but we have not had it yet. and is there concern... should other brits in russia be concerned that they could potentially be picked up? this is something that is under active consideration and we're constantly reviewing our travel advice in all parts of the world. if we see the needs for a change, then we will make it. earlier we heard from our diplomatic correspondent james landale. he is accused of espionage. he was arrested by russian state security forces last week. he is being held in fla notorious moscow prison. he has been visited by the american ambassador to moscow syria has had some consular access but not british. he is enjoyed national body as more american than british. he
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has lived most of his life in the united states. he was in the marines for many years. he has been arrested and is now charged with espionage. the allegation that has been suggested is that he was picked up ina suggested is that he was picked up in a hotel in possession of a memory stick that had, allegedly, a list of intelligence employees. that is not corroborated. that is just one claim bya corroborated. that is just one claim by a russian news agency. interesting from jeremy hunt saying this was a diplomatic chess game, a political minivan? his family claim this is all nonsense. she was there for the wedding of a former colleague in the marines who was marrying a russian women which is why she was in moscow. at the end of
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last year, a woman was arrested and convicted in the united states. she isa convicted in the united states. she is a russian national anti—gun confusing us. she was found guilty after she pleaded guilty to the charges of being a russian state agent trying to influence us conservative groups, particularly the gun lobby. the suggestion is, merely speculative, this former us marine has been arrested. potentially, at some point in the future, some sort of exchange could be carried out. these things have happened before and they can take quite a long time. the winners of a euromillions jackpot of almost £115 million have been revealed as frances and patrick connolly from moira in county armagh. it is the fourth biggest euromillions win in the uk. our ireland correspondent, chris page is there for us.
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the couple seem like an absolutely lovely, level—headed couple. obviously shocked by this but with some plans as well? about right. patrick and france's probably started the year in a way that they couldn't have imagined. they have w011 couldn't have imagined. they have won if watching just shy of £150 million. the champagne has been flowing here, they have been speaking to the media here. —— 115 million. the whole world are watching. they saying they are giving away some of that money to a list of 50 family and friends. also, planning to enjoy holidays abroad and new cars. we have been talking about all this in a news conference
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in the last hour. even know you got the information physically, you still couldn't believe it? obviously, you are su btle believe it? obviously, you are subtle and you think that you might have won almost £115 million. and he kept repeating that. and the numbers, over and over again. the 70p left off the cheque is really, really important to him! . you sat there and then you say that you went to bed? retired. 20 minutes later, i was back downstairs. i think you had an arbitrator on? multi-wink. you we re an arbitrator on? multi-wink. you were lying there thinking how you're doing to spend it, it's a huge amount of money. what were you doing? what were your thoughts? when the e—mail came through and we started talking to each other, this
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is kind of you. you're asking us, do we it? we are much about. but believing it in your head and acknowledging it as meaning anything is different. it didn't mean anything at that point. we started seeing, the only thing we have done is make a list of all the people that we are going to give money to. instead of going onto the internet and looking at the biggest house you could buy, shopping trips, holidays, all those things. you say that you sat down there and read elicit? like eve ryo ne sat down there and read elicit? like everyone else in the county, we sat ata everyone else in the county, we sat at a table and says what would we do everyone? i knew the house i was going to buy, the court, how much money the kids was going to get— what a bother. but this was... it
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was different. immediately, the list was different. immediately, the list was made. so this is a physical list of people that you are good to show me money with? how many people are on the list? at the moment, about 50. you have a list of 50 people? you are going to make more millionaires? definitely not. do they know? no. how are you going to tell them? underfunded for others, —— be funded for others,... the second thing i have to do was to stop them from terry opportunist. it is what in my favour because it's such a big amount of money. i want to go and see people's faces. the
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pleasure for me will be sealed now faces and asking them what we can do for them. how quickly are you doing? are you starting now? some straightaway. we have three daughters and grandchildren, they will at least get something straightaway. we have to get time to get the money and get it into the proper bank accounts, all that kind of practical stuff. it may take a month before we can really do anything majorfor month before we can really do anything major for people. month before we can really do anything majorfor people. but, as $0011 anything majorfor people. but, as soon as you can. anything majorfor people. but, as 50011 as you can. have anything majorfor people. but, as soon as you can. have to watch out how you will tell them? we thought a little bit but we will sort of wing it. definitely face—to—face. the headlines on bbc news: there is little evidence screentime is harmful to children's health — as leading paediatricians tell
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parents to worry less. police say there is growing evidence that members of organised criminal gangs getjobs in prisons to smuggle in drugs — as the first x—ray scanner is installed in a prison in england. premier league leaders liverpool boss for the first time this season, being beat 2—1 by manchester city. the third round of the fa cup kicks off this evening. the us anti—doping agency renews its call for russia to be suspended again after they failed to meet a deadline to allow investigators into the moscow laboratory. the democratic unionist party has expressed concern over developments regarding
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the brexit withdrawal agreement. the party's brexit secretary sammy wilson said the dup is "more alarmed by what's coming out" regarding the so—called northern ireland backstop — and said irish pm leo varadkar seems to regard it as a "settled arrangement." our political correspondent iain watson is at westminster. jonathan, for those of all things brexit will know that the dup are crucial to theresa may ‘s hopes of getting her deal through parliament but it is not looking likely at the moment, is it? it is not looking likely at all. the dup dup provide those extra numbers in the house of commons to roll out theresa may to get any kind of legislation passed. that is the case with her brexit deal. says it has been agreed, the dup has been opposed, particularly
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the element that we call the backstop. that is the insurance policy to prevent a hard border between long island and eager public of ireland if a tree deal cannot be reached by 2020. downing st will have helped that mps were reflecting on the chances of the deal getting through parliament and what might happen if it didn't. as mps return to westminster this week, that is no sign that those opposed before has changed the minds. that is particularly relevant to the dup. yesterday, the premise had the dup's deputy leader in for lunch at downing street. despite whatever reassu ra nces downing street. despite whatever reassurances theresa may was able to give, there was a statement that the position of the dup has not changed. this morning, sammy wilson expressed that they are more alarmed by never about the potential reassurances of
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what is coming out of brussels and here in the uk about the prospects of theresa may's deal and what the backstop would mean. there are still many melons that need to be changed. between now and next wednesday when they have the next five—day debate, leading up we think this time to an actual meaningful vote, what will happen? mps will come back from their constituencies and return to westminster. we will have those five days of debate in parliament which will restart after the vote was delayed before christmas because it became clear that theresa may was heading for defeat. we'll be here at the same argument again? the same problems that people have with the deal, they will use the platform in that debate to voice their concerns and put their challenges to theresa may and the other cabinet misfits who will be reading that night. they're also be charm offensive from
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downing street to get mps on board. to persuade them that the risk of not supporting the deal is too great. that it made bread brexit at risk. i'm sure ability that argument over the next few days. thank you for joining over the next few days. thank you forjoining us. the two largest london airports are to spend millions of pounds on anti—drone technology following the disruption at gatwick before christmas. more than 140,000 passengers were affected and over a thousand flights cancelled or diverted during 36 hours of chaos caused by drone sightings. gatwick says it's now spent £5 million on comunications jamming equipment — and heathrow‘s confirmed it'll be buying similar systems. a royal navy patrol ship has been sent to the english channel to help prevent migrants crossing from france. hms mersey was diverted from routine operations after the home secretary sajid javid requested the navy's help.
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around 240 people have arrived in the uk on small boats since november. new research suggests that patients are made to wait twice as long for an ambulance when 999 is dialled from a doctor's surgery. it's according to a response to a freedom of information request from 10 of the 13 ambulance services across the uk. ambulance bosses insist all calls are prioritised on clinical need. a tropical storm has forced the evacuation of tens of thousands of holidaymakers from southern thailand. many flights and ferry services have been cancelled amid fears it could be the worst to hit the country in almost 30 years. it's currently making its way across the country's southern coast, hitting resort islands including koh samui, a favourite with british tourists. our correspondent jonathan head gave us this update a little earlier. it has already made landfall, hitting the province of nakhon si thammarat, a little south of koh samui and its associated island
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of koh phangan and koh tao — the three islands that were in the path of the storm. they are getting heavy rain and strong gusts of wind and higher tides at the moment. so, people have been advised to stay away from beaches, the risk of being swept away, and generally stay inside solid buildings. probably one of the greatest risks to health are bits of debris being blown around by the winds. around 30,000 people have been evacuated — mostly local people — from coastal areas where the storm struck, the strongest part of it. most of the tourists who left have actually left the island simply to avoid being trapped there. for the moment, all air and sea transport links have been cut and they are not expected to be restored probably for the next 2a hours. those winds are moving across. it is quite a narrow part of thailand. they will also affect beaches on the west side, the andaman sea island,
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perhaps not so much. but the authorities are warning there will be very heavy rain with the possibility of flooding and also the possibility of landslides as well. so, they are still urging people — there is no need to be massively worried but they are urging them to be cautious and to stay indoors at the moment. the us house of representatives — now under democratic control — has passed legislation that would re—open the federal government without paying for president trump's wall with mexico. it happened soon after the democrats took control of the house and reinstated veteran democrat, nancy pelosi, as speaker. but the legislation will be rejected by the republican—controlled senate and by president trump himself. david willis reports from washington. it is, in her words, a new dawn in american politics. 12 years ago, nancy pelosi made history as the first woman elected speaker of the house of representatives. now, she has staged an equally historic comeback to lead the first
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democratic majority there since 2010. two months ago, the american people spoke and demanded a new dawn. they called upon the beauty of our constitution and our system of checks and balances that protects our democracy. but the smiles belie a bitterly divided political landscape and two parties who can't even agree on the funding needed to keep the federal government open. at the heart of the stand—off, is president trump's demand for $5 billion for a wall along the mexican border — his signature issue on the campaign trail. he took to the white house briefing room for the first time, flanked by border patrol agents, and having congratulated nancy pelosi, vowed there would be no backing down over the wall. you can call it a barrier. you can call it whatever you want. but, essentially, we need protection in our country.
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we're going to make it good. the people of our country want it. i have never had so much support as i have the last week over my stance for border security, for border control, and for, frankly, the wall or the body. one of the first things the democratic controlled house budget on the was finding that would reopen those government departments that are currently embroiled in the shutdown. but the measures included no funding for the wall, which democrats see as the repudiation of the very principles on which this country was built. a wall is an immorality. it is not who we are as a nation. and this is not a wall between mexico and the united states that the president is creating here. it's a wall between reality and his constituents. but the partial shutdown is its first and highly pressing challenge. another meeting is due later today at the white house, involving the president
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and congressional leaders. but there is no resolution in sight, some two weeks after the shutdown began. china has confirmed that it will host trade talks with the united states next week, as nervousness continues on global stock markets. they will be the first face—to—face discussions since presidents xi jinping and donald trump declared a ninety—day truce in their trade war in early december. now it's time for a look at the weather. we had a pretty cool start to d—day. the temperatures in wales, nina plans and southern parts of england has got well below freezing. we got some sunshine in southern areas this morning. for the north, that is more cloud around. certainly for
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scotland, northern ireland and northern parts of england, it will stay cloudy this afternoon. temperatures will get 27 or 9 degrees. elsewhere, typical values are at around 3—6d. through there will be a lot of cloud. if you break here and there will give us frost in some places. in places with the wonders chris bell's, it will get down to —3, minus four degrees. into the weekend, the bill be sunny spells, particularly to the east of the uk. otherwise, it will be cloudy. sunday will be similar but the temperatures will come up a touch— nine, 10 degrees. perhaps not as called for the second half of the weekend. hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: parents are told to worry less about their children spending time looking at screens, as experts say there is little evidence it is harmful to their health
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there are harms from screens, but actually, screens bring us great opportunities and we have to balance those. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen. uk house prices grew at the slowest annual rate last month since february 2013, according to nationwide building society. a couple from northern ireland who won the fourth—biggest uk euromillions prize, almost £115 million, say they've written a list of 50 family and friends to share their fortune with. let's get a look at the sport now. a big game last night?
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the premier league title race has been blown open after manchester city beat liverpool 2—1. surgery or aguero it gave them the lead just before half—time. douglas sergio aguero. be stayed ahead until 64 minutes, when roberto firmino equalised for the visitors. pep guardiola said they needed to win this match to keep in touch with liverpool, and leroy sane congested advice of moment with a little help from the post to end liverpool's 20—game unbeaten run. from the post to end liverpool's 20-game unbeaten run. the league is so tough, in among all the contenders. maybe you will not ee, contenders. maybe you will not agree, but now everybody‘s closer
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and it will be fun. it does feel really good, but it's not a massive thing, because this is the most difficult game of the season, away at city, tottenham, arsenal, united, most of these we have had now already, so that's it. tottenham are away at tranmere in the fa cup tonight, tranmere going well have been promoted from the national league this summer. tottenham last won the fa cup in 19 91. a potential ba na na won the fa cup in 19 91. a potential banana skin for manager pochettino. need to be sure that we show our best face, competitive, right attitude, that is going to be the key to play this type of competition. it is a massive competition. it is a massive
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competition and the different level we are in in different leagues. but if you're not right and take it the right weight, you can struggle. there will be updates on that match tonight on radio 5 live bus text commentary on the bbc sport website. just in commentary on the bbc sport website. justina commentary on the bbc sport website. just in a women have made their first signing of 2018 with a goalkeeper joining first signing of 2018 with a goalkeeperjoining from first signing of 2018 with a goalkeeper joining from birmingham city. she is described as the best keeper in the wsl for the last few seasons. she says she is looking for to playing with one of the best clu bs to playing with one of the best clubs in the world. rory mcilroy is three shots of the pace in hawaii. mcilroy is buying this event for the first time this prepares to switch focus to the pga tour. he seemed to enjoy it, hitting five birdies in
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around 69. kevin ads leads the way by one shot. the head of the united states anti—doping agency, travis tygart, has called for immediate action after russian officials refused to grant their investigators access to a moscow laboratory at the heart of the doping scandal. he said the situation was a total joke and has urged wada — the world anti—doping agency — to declare russia noncompliant with the world doping code once again, which would reverse a recent decision to allow russian athletes to compete in international competition. when are we going to wake and sime, stop getting played by the russians who perpetrated this schema, but an end to it and at least give athletes a clear message that we have their back, that their decision to compete queen is absolutely the right decision and we're sorry the russians did this. make no mistake, it was nobody‘s fault but the russians that they pulled this
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scheme off in the first place, they got away with it. but now it is time to hold them to account. that is what the rules demand. that's all for now, it see you soon. the first uk guidance on children's screen time says there is no firm evidence that using devices such as smart phones and computers is harmful to young people's health. the royal college of paediatrics and child health says no specific time limits should be placed on children's use of screens, but it recommends they're avoided in the hour before bedtime. they do have ipads, but only allow them to use them during school holidays, during term time, they are locked away. he has to get off and read books. i don't think they should be on it so long. these i say, please, can i have more time?
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they should be playing with electronic devices, they are part of the world. but they also need to figure out things for themselves as well. it's possible to take ipads from young children. however, i do think you can monitor the matter time they spend on it. you need to make sure you don't use it as a baby—sitter. make sure you don't use it as a baby-sitter. we're love it because we both wear specs. we're we don't wa nt to we both wear specs. we're we don't want to get strained eyes. and they're doors of the future, so they need to learn. they're faster than us! with me now is belinda parmar. her nephew was the first child in britain to be diagnosed with games addiction. and i'm joined from bristol by dr dominique thompson, a student health gp who welcomes the advice from the royal college of paediatrics and child health. great to have you both joining great to have you bothjoining us. why do you welcome this advice?”
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think it's really helpful to have some pragmatic advice from a respected agency like the royal college. we've needed this for a while, an overview of all the studies done so far. they tell us there is some harm, usually in relation to obesity and increased calorie intake from using screens a lots, but actually using screens in general is not harmful. is there a lot of what you might call actual guidance in this, though?” lot of what you might call actual guidance in this, though? i think there've done what they can with the research, which in itself is not of great strength or quality. but i do think it is helpful to have reiterated for us the fact that screens should not be used before bed, for example, because we keep the brain awake for longer. think we have to be pragmatic about the evidence out there and we know from pa rents evidence out there and we know from parents that unrestricted use of anything is probably not a great
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idea. i would anything is probably not a great idea. iwould never let anything is probably not a great idea. i would never let my child have unrestricted use of sugar, so i am unlikely to do the same with a screen. melinda, the report is saying that one size doesn't fit all when it comes to the amount of screen time a child has, is that fair? i think that is fair, i think the debate is nuanced. however these are guidelines without any guidance. there is no guidance here. this is a missed opportunity. i would question whether the authors of this report have teenagers, whether they have daughters using social media or sons playing video games because you just need to live in the real world to know that tech addiction is one of the biggest issues of our time. when you contacted me on twitter earlier, you contacted me on twitter earlier, you were talking about the point of difference between what is uk guidance is saying and the advice of
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the us, which you say is something around a maximum of two avarice a day. wouldn't it be helpful if there was a specific figure put on it here? i completely agree it would be lovely to have a specific figure we could all work towards. the information coming from the states generally has been coming from a particular professor in california who has looked at all the studies and found the optimum amount of screen time for mental health is about two hours. that is to say that less tha n about two hours. that is to say that less than two hours may indicate the children don't have great social connections or lots of friends and more than two avarice could be detrimental to their wellbeing. so two hours a day is thought to be reasonably healthy. you wanted to come in on that point? feedback is that all the evidence they looked at
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it the past. technology is changing so it the past. technology is changing so fast. the thing i do agree on is there isn't enough evidence. they say there is no causal link, cassie today a medical study has come out looking at 10,000 teenagers that say there is a link, if you spend more than three hours, if a teenage girl spends more than three hours a day on social media, you are twice as likely to suffer from depression. that is the same day as this study has come out. i think they are right to say there is not enough evidence, but they should say we will get that evidence and in the meantime, these are the things we think will help parents. we talk about preventative medicine, are you saying this should be preventative advice, almost? no—one thinks we should live on a remote island without technology. you are not a luddite by any means, you have been awarded an obe award for services to women in technology.
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no—one knows how to navigate this. one thing! no—one knows how to navigate this. one thing i found very helpful is to work with parents of your children to really establish ground rules together so the children are online. what happens is, the technology becomes about pressure, not pleasure. we need boundaries. the research isn't there, but what they could have done is say here are some things you can do. this is what good looks like, this is what parameters should be, and they failed to do that. any world we live in, you just need to hear from the vt, i think it's quite disappointing. dear accept that criticism, the royal couege accept that criticism, the royal college could have done more to set allow matters and did not? at the difficulty is that medical people can only use the evidence they have to then set guidance. so they will
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find it very hard to say you should only use it for this long or parents should set these boundaries if there's no evidence to back that up. it may be common sense, and i com pletely it may be common sense, and i completely agree that we have to have boundaries for our children, but we would say that about anything, their diets, bedtime, exercise, even. we need to be sure we have boundaries when they're young and don't yet understand the implications of what they're doing. as they get older, we need to have conversations with them to ensure they understand why he things not be good for then. then they can make those decisions for themselves as they get older, because they are a generation for whom artificial intelligence is probably one of the greater threats to theirjobs in the future. the need to be able to manage technology. we shouldn't scaremonger, but the evidence isn't
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there to say clearly this is what you should and shouldn't do, around things like bedtime. so we have this tension around what evidence there is or isn't and perhaps, as mentioned there, a common sense feeling from parents that their children ought to be spending a little less time on tech. how do you find a resolution between those two points of view? i would dispute the fa ct points of view? i would dispute the fact there isn't evidence. asked a gp, the numberof fact there isn't evidence. asked a gp, the number of young children coming in with mental health problems is higher than before. i run workshops in skills, kids are gaming for11 run workshops in skills, kids are gaming for 11 hours straight and saint what's the problem? they don't have the knowledge. there may not be passed evidence but you just need to live in the real world to find the evidence. there is no cartridge resolution, but but there is, we need to start understanding the facts and not keep putting pressure
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back to the parents. these tech companies, they make an average $50 million and hour, why are they not investing in research to give us the data? but behind everyone's front door, it is parents have to make the final decision. true, but would need help navigating that. because one house has a different resolution to their necks, and we need consistency so their necks, and we need consistency so children know what is good for then. do you think a lot of parents will be surprised by what the royal couege will be surprised by what the royal college says today or do you think it it will give them license to relax over screen time? first of all, i think it will reassure them not to be overly worried but to continue with boundaries as i have said with everything, it's important there are limits. you wouldn't give your child sweets without a
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boundary. so that bet of it, it will reassure them slightly. as a gp with interest in mental health, i have seen more than my fair share of young people with mental health problems, and what i can tell you is that social media and screens are not actually the cause. there's no causal link we are seeing, they are a magnifying glass for everything else happening around them. i agree there is a problem with having too much social media, for example, for young women who are exposed to the co nsta nt young women who are exposed to the constant drive of competitiveness and reflection on a social media, but we have to therefore talk to them about how that isn't good for their health and adapt as parents to their health and adapt as parents to the current threats in our society, the current threats in our society, the same as the generation before us didn't for bears. 0k, thank you both telling us about your varying points of view on this story, thank you. reports from germany say hundreds of german politicians have
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had their personal details hacked and published online. the information, including contact details and credit card numbers, was posted on a twitter account in the form of an advent calendar, with a link to more information posted each day in the run—up to christmas. victims include the president frank—walter steinmeier earlier i spoke to our correspondent damien mcguinness, who's in berlin for us. this is the largest data leak that germany has ever experienced. it's incredibly serious when you consider that this is extremely sensitive and personal information. it ranges from family photos, private correspondence, e—mails, messages between family members and politicians — right through to banking and financial information. as you say, the president has been affected, the whole german government cabinet has been affected. angela merkel herself has been affected — e—mail information of hers has been released, private letters and correspondence has been leaked. so it's incredibly personal information, including addresses and contact information. so it depends what could be done with that information, in terms of safety and security.
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it's also very important because it's hit almost a whole sector of society in germany. it's gone right through germany's political leadership. every single political party, apart from the right—wing populist alternative for germany party, has been hit. also quite prominentjournalists, prominent tv personalities, such as the very famous tv comedian jan bohmermann have been affected. some musicians, some rappers. what they all have in common is that they are all, generally, quite politically active. they express a lot of political opinions. for example, the comedian has been very critical of right—wing populism. the rappers have been very supportive of certain left—wing issues. that has led to some speculation that there is some sort of political link or motivation. so far, there is no evidence who is behind this attack but there is speculation that there might be some sort of link with german right—wing extremists.
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or, alternatively, that could be some sort of connection with state actors, or individuals even, in russia or china. but so far, investigations are still carrying on and there is no evidence as to who is actually behind this attack, or why they carried it out. any moments, all the business news. there is little evidence screentime is harmful to children's health, as leading paediatricians tell parents to worry less. police say there is growing evidence that members of organised criminal gangs getjobs in prisons to smuggle in drugs, as the first x—ray scanner is installed in a prison in england. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen. i'm vishala sripathma. in the business news: uk house prices grew at an annual
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pace of 0.5% in december, the slowest annual rate since february 2013. nationwide building society, who released the figures, said uncertainty over the economic outlook appears to be undermining confidence in the market. and it mayjust be four days into the new year, but the average boss on the ftse 100 has already earned more than the typical worker will earn all year. the average pay of a ftse100 chief executive is just over £1000 per hour. the typical uk salary isjust under £30,000. energy supplier economy energy has been banned from taking on new customers until it improves its customer service. the energy regulator ofgem said the ban would remain in place for three months to allow the firm to improve its customer contact procedures. it must also address billing and payment failures, and issue customer refunds in a timely manner. morning, welcome to the business news today, lots to get through this morning. now, its probably that time of the year where you're looking over what you spent
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during the christmas period. there was lots of heavy discounting by retailers, so you might have managed to snap up some bargains. but according to the british retail consortium's shop price index, concerns over the uk's future relationship with european union supplies continued to edge prices higher. joining us now is rachel lund, head of insight and analytics at the british retail consortium. thank you forjoining us. can you explain to us about how that affects prices, how concerns over suppliers affects prices? what we're seeing going on is food prices are edging back a bit but the prices of non—food items have stabilised this year after about five years of falling. we believe that is the impact of the depreciation of the pound after the referendum vote. the
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impact that the departure from the eu is likely to have won't manifest in till after we actually leave the eu. the danger there is that there are new tariffs and non—tariff barriers that increase the cost of importing. so there might be an increase in prices after we leave the eu. at the moment we don't really know what's happening in till that deal goes to vote in parliament. what's going on with food prices? at the moment, we are seeing food price inflation fall debates. global food seeing food price inflation fall debates. globalfood prices earlier in the year started to subside and we are now seeing that the through to consumer prices. and with your reports, you looked at the festive period, generally a time where we see discounts and bargains to be had. you said prices still edged higher? yes. retailers still offered
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pretty big discounts and an non—food items, prices are still down, just not as down as the past. part of thatis not as down as the past. part of that is due to the style of discount retailers are offering. rather than a straightforward reduction, they are a straightforward reduction, they a re often a straightforward reduction, they are often offering multi—byte deals or percentage get out of the whole basket. which will be recorded as a reduction on individual items. the online nature with which we shop now, does that make a difference? on the go down the high street and find prices are higher, why not go when the internet and find a bargain there? most retailers now have similar pricing across their stores and online as well. that's because retailers know that consumers will do retailers know that consumers will d o exa ctly retailers know that consumers will do exactly that, if they see of the inner shop they will look for it online activities cheaper there, they will buy that. thank you very much. looking at the markets, a falling
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day yesterday. the ftse100 closed at 6,692 yesterday — down 0.6%. today the market has opened higher, trading up 0.6%. the mood has improved after markets in hong kong and china edged higher after thursday's turbulence sparked by apple's warnings of a slowdown in the chinese economy. now, some of those shares that took a knocking yesterday, like burberry, have seen some recovery today. roughly about the same as what got not yesterday. global markets have generally been helped by optimism about possible trade talks between the us and china. the market is also waiting for us jobs data which is due later, although that could be delayed because of the partial government shutdown going on in washington at the moment. a quick look at sterling, the currency was its lowest level since april 2017 yesterday. but higher today quite considerably.
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that's all the business news. in a moment the weather, but first let's look at some varying cloud over the weekends, we will get some sunshine today as well. there is sunshine across many southern parts of the uk, this is the kent coastline with blue sky. high pressure in charge of our weather, and around this band of pressure, southerly winds across northern ireland and the west of scotla nd northern ireland and the west of scotland giving us something milder. but for the rest of us, pretty chilly. much more clouds out there co m pa res to chilly. much more clouds out there compares to what these graphics show, the models are struggling at the moment with the amount of clouds we have across the uk. temperatures around 8 degrees in northwestern areas, otherwise around six.
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tonight, again, a lot of clouds, but brea ks tonight, again, a lot of clouds, but breaks give us frost into the morning. temperatures as low as minus three degrees. but where we keep cloud, those temperatures staying above freezing. a chilly start to saturday. through the weekends, largely dry, some sunny spells. on saturday, the best of those sunny spells across eastern areas of england and the east of scotland. otherwise, mostly cloudy, and thick enough by saturday across the west of scotland and northern ireland for rain. temperatures around 8 degrees in the north west, 5 degrees elsewhere. by sunday, this cold front moving in to this area of high pressure so it will still wea ken high pressure so it will still weaken and cloud moving
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southeastwards. but the winds will become from a southwesterly direction, influencing more of us, not quite as cold. cloudy for england and wales, but more sunshine across scotland and the far north of northern ireland. the temperatures up northern ireland. the temperatures up by northern ireland. the temperatures up bya northern ireland. the temperatures up by a couple of degrees, perhaps even double figures in the south west. next week, monday, strong when is in the far north of scotland, some rain as well. by tuesday onwards, high—pressure dominating again, so settling down. a lot of cloud with summer breaks to give sunshine and temperatures stable at around 9 degrees. a you're watching bbc newsroom live.
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these are today's main stories: parents are told to worry less about their children spending time looking at screens, as experts say there is little evidence it is harmful to their health the first x—ray scanner is intalled in a prison in england, as police say there's evidence members of criminal gangs get prison jobs to smuggle in drugs. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen a couple from northern ireland who won the fourth biggest uk euromillions prize , almost £115 million, say they've written a list
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of 50 family and friends to share their fortune with. and coming up in our sports bulletin — manchester city reignite the premier league title race, as they beat liverpool 2—1 and reduce their lead at the top of the table. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm annita mcveigh. child health experts have said there is no firm evidence that spending time looking at computer screens and smartphones is harmful to children. in the first official uk guidance, the royal college of paediatrics and child health said no specific time limits should be placed on children's use of screens, but it recommended they should be avoided for an hour before sleep. here's our medical correspondent, fergus walsh. young people today grow up
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surrounded by digital entertainment and information on multiple screens — whether via computer, smartphone, or television. in its guidance to parents, the royal college says the popular view that time in front of a screen is toxic to health has essentially no evidence to support it. many things are harmful to us. crossing the road is harmful. even reading, which we think of as a really important thing, actually, is a bit of a sedentary occupation that can keep you up at night. so we think that there is a balance to be struck. there are harms from screens, but actually, screens bring us great opportunities and we have to balance those. it says there are some associations between higher screen use and obesity and depression, but notes that the reported rise in mental health problems among young people was apparent before the advent of social media and digital technologies. it recommends families ask themselves four questions. is screen time in your
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household controlled? does it interfere with what your family wants to do? does it interfere with sleep? and are you able to control snacking during screen time? the guidance says parents with healthy, active children shouldn't worry greatly about computer and smartphone use, although it recommends no screens for an hour before bed, in part because the light can slow the release of the sleep—inducing hormone, melatonin. the royal college says families should negotiate screen time limits with their children based on individual needs, and how much they impact on sleep, physical and social activities. lots of you have been responding on twitter to this for example, a man who calls himself ‘grumpster‘ says it is advice "in a vacuum" and "is meaningless" as excess social media has links with mental health issues. others believe the research is simply "common sense,"
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and "extended time sitting down staring at a screen is harmful" — people need to get up and go out. more with me in the studio is daniel bower, who is the co—founder and chief executive of hoop — a family activity app used by over 900 families throughout the uk. water you bring all this report? are you surprised that isn't a more guidance? screen time is definitely a topic that the families we speak to think about a lot, it is something that concerns them. we
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we re something that concerns them. we were surprised that there is no clearer guidance. the advice around springtime around bedtime was a good one but it was a shame there wasn't more. earlier, the royal college of paediatricians that they're doing more research about what is clear. they said that they didn't find evidence and they went, to give pa rents evidence and they went, to give parents guidance that wasn't evidence —based. parents guidance that wasn't evidence -based. i completely support that. from the report today, there was a call for more research into the area to highlight problems that may exist. the families you work with, you say that they are actively seeking more guidance? that's right. the use of the app because they know that getting out of the house and doing things with their children as positive for fitness and mental health. they are acutely aware of the problems that come with excessive screen time. they are looking for more guidance, we provide with selections but i think that there are also looking
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for other advice. in terms of building healthy habits around screens and technology, what advice do you cover them on that? we don't give them the specific guidance. we talk about how balancing the kind of quality screen time that exists few educational games are worth maybe the stuff that is more concerning— over communication and things like that. ultimately, it is down to individual parents and homes to make the decisions that are right for the child, depending on their age. what things should they look up for? tell—tale signs that their child is spending too much time using the tech? one of the really good points from the report is that if they feel that screen time is preventing them from sharing family time, conversing over a meal, getting out of the
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house and in thing in the community, that every oil tell—tale sign that it is too much screen time. it is controlling the child, rather than the child controlling it. exactly. the first x—ray scanner has been installed in a prison in england, as part of the government's programme to reduce drug—related violence. it can detect packages hidden inside a prisoner's body, as our home affairs correspondent danny shaw explains. stand up onto the two black marks. that's it. spin around and face me. just place one hand on to that. using x—ray technology, making prisons safer. this is the first body scanner to be installed as part of the government's programme to reduce drugs and violence in ten of the worst affected prisons in england. nearly finished. it can detect packages hidden inside a prisoner's body. this is an image of an inmate found with concealed drugs on the first day the device was deployed. you can see the straight edges, which shouldn't be inside the human body. the scanner operates in a similar
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way to a standard hospital x—ray machine, but the level of radiation is 400 times lower. leeds is one of ten prisons that are being given investment to reduce drug taking and violence by next summer. but it's a difficult task and there is no guarantee it will happen. there's also a concern some of the ten prisons could reduce assaults simply by moving violent offenders to otherjails. that's definitely a risk. i'm very, very clear, though, that we need to play this fair. the idea is that i can look other governors in the face and say, we turned around these ten prisons without cheating. the drugs trade is controlled by organised crime groups and there's evidence some criminals deliberately getjobs in prisons to bring contraband in. the foreign office has confirmed that a former us marine, accused of spying in russia,
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is also a british citizen. paul whelan was detained by russian security services a week ago — officials said he was caught "carrying out spying activities." this morning, foreign secretary jeremy hunt said that british authorities were helping the us in mr whelan's case. we are not ruling out any of the ladies at all but the stage as to why this might have happened. we articulate worried about paul whelan. we offered consular assistance. the us are leading because he is a british and american citizens. our position is very clear. it is a straightforward point that individuals should not be used as pawns of diplomatic lavage. we need to see what these charges are against him and understand whether there is a case or not. we are giving every support that we can but
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we don't agree with individuals being used in diplomatic chess games because it is desperately worrying, not just for the because it is desperately worrying, notjust for the individual, because it is desperately worrying, not just for the individual, but theirfamilies. we not just for the individual, but their families. we are extremely worried about him and his family as we feel this news. have britain worried about him and his family as we feelthis news. have britain had access to him? we have offered assistance, but has not been picked up. if the content for other bits and moscow? we are constantly updating information for travelling around the world. every see need to be the change, we will do so. he is accused of espionage. he was arrested by russian state security forces last week. he is being held in russia's notorious moscow prison. he has been visited by the american ambassador to moscow so has had some consular access, but not british.
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he is dual national but he is more american than british. he has lived most of his life in the united states. he was in the marines corps for many years. he has been arrested and is now charged with espionage. the allegation that has been suggested is that he was picked up in a hotel in possession of a memory stick that of a memory stick that had, allegedly, a list of intelligence employees at a russian agency. that is not corroborated. that is just one claim by a russian news agency. interesting from jeremy hunt saying this was a political minivan? a political manouvere? his family claim this is all nonsense. he was there for the wedding of a former
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colleague in the marines who was marrying a russian woman which is why he was in moscow. at the end of last year, a woman was arrested and convicted in the united states. she is a russian national a gun enthusiast. she was found guilty after she pleaded guilty to the charges of being a russian state agent trying to influence us conservative groups, particularly, the gun lobby. the suggestion is, this is merely speculative, this former us marine has been picked up and arrested. potentially, at some point in the future, some sort of exchange could be carried out. these things have happened before and they can take quite a long time. one person is reported to have been killed after a powerful tropical storm made landfall on the south east coast of thailand. storm pabuk has caused thousands of people to flee their homes and move
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to specially prepared shelters. some of the country's most popular tourist destinations will face major disruption in what is meant to be peak holiday season. our correspondentjonathan head is in bangkok. we mentioned in the introduction specially prepared shelters. harwell is the country, the islands, prepared for this storm?” is the country, the islands, prepared for this storm? i think pretty well prepared. the designated shelters are building is strong enough to withstand the gales. this is not a full—size typhoon that you get out in the pacific. it is a strong tropical storm. the biggest concern are tidal surges because of the risk of waves coming up and hitting buildings close to the beach. the possibility of landslides also. they have no one about the storms for the last 48 hours and
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have designated buildings that people can go to. by and large, this storm is affecting all the main tourist beaches in thailand. as it passes the andaman sea areas, they are advising people to simply stay in their hotels. to stay off the streets because of debris been learning about. stay off the beaches until the storm has passed, which should be in the next 12 hours or so. as far as safety is concerned, people feel what has been done. some jealousy that they have been told what to do. common sense with some practice is to stay inside. perhaps moderately holiday that many tourists were expecting. but their safety is priority of course. how much damage is this to tourist
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infrastructure? i don't think it will be particularly bad. the authorities are concerned about the possibility of events in local areas —a possibility of events in local areas — a sudden tidal surge or landslides. we haven't heard of anything that the yet. it is obviously very destructive to jewellers, particularly transport because many tenants will have to reschedule flights over the next few days, some will have to find new places to stay for the next night or two. that will be disruptive but it will not cause major damage to the tourist industry in the long term. thank you link on the foreign office confirmed
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that paul whelan, a former us marine, accused of spying in russia is also a british citizen. sport now. a fascinating encounter at the eddie head. cities when end liverpool ‘s run of 20 games without being beaten. i don't remember a lead with such huge contenders are fighting for the penalty. for the premier league, it will be good. now eve ryo ne league, it will be good. now everyone is closer and every game is a good one. it doesn't feel really
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good but it is not a massive thing. this is the most difficult game of the season, away at city, away at tottenham and united. we have had most of these games already. the football association is asking people to comp all with information after an unnamed england player was reported to have been kicked out of a nightclub for taking cocaine. the fa can ban players found to have beachis fa can ban players found to have beach is social drug policy. if first—time offence carrying a suspension of up to three months. they say it is a priority to find anyone using performance enhancing drugs. the newspaper allegation claims it happened during a pre—christmas get—together. the us and she has repeated its call for russia to be banned after
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investigators were refused entry to you moscow laboratory at the heart of the scandal. two of our russian athletes to participate in competitions, provided certain steps are being taken. when i began to wa ke are being taken. when i began to wake up and stop the russians. at least give clean athletes get clear message that we have their backs. the decision to compete clean is absolutely the right decision. we are sorry that the russians that this. this is the result but the russians that they pulled off this scheme and got away with it. now is the time to hold them accountable. that is what the olympic values demand. that is what the rules demand. house prices saw the biggest fall last month since 2012, according to figures from nationwide. the mortgage lender said prices fell 0.7% in november — house prices saw the biggest fall last month since 2012, according
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and annual rises are at their slowest pace in nearly six years. our business presenter dharshini david explained the details. nationwide is one of our biggest lenders, of course, what they're saying is, if you look at what happened last month, in the 12 months to december, house prices were up byjust 0.5%. we haven't seen those kind of tiny increases since february 2013. nationwide are saying there are two things holding things back in the property market. first of all, we've had that squeeze on real incomes. yes, the average wage is maybe outpacing inflation again, but that hasn't been happening for very long. and on top of that, remember, people are very nervous about what lies ahead. so much uncertainty, and that is weighing down on the market, despite the fact we have these low borrowing costs. what lies underneath, you start lifting the bonnet on these figures, it's quite interesting — big north/south divide. the north outpacing the south in terms of these price rises for the last two years or so. so on the one hand, some opportunities there are for first—time buyers, but on the other, even though that gap is narrowing, the average home in the south is still worth twice as much
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as the average home in the north. and of course, the big question is, what happens this year? well, the nationwide says, if you look at the broader picture, we have very low unemployment, low interest rates, that should mean modest price rises as long as we do see clarity over the path for brexit. the two largest london airports are to spend millions of pounds on anti—drone technology, after the disruption at gatwick before christmas. more than 140,000 passengers were affected and more than a thousand flights cancelled or diverted, during 36 hours of chaos caused by drone sightings. gatwick says it's now spent £5 million on comunications jamming equipment — and heathrow‘s confirmed it'll be buying similar systems. a royal navy patrol ship has been sent to the english channel to help prevent migrants crossing from france. hms mersey was diverted from routine operations after the home secretary sajid javid requested the navy's help. around 240 people have
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arrived in the uk on small boats since november. the us house of representatives, now under democratic control, has passed legislation that would re—open the federal government without paying for president trump's wall with mexico. it happened soon after the democrats took control of the house and reinstated veteran democrat, nancy pelosi, as speaker. but the legislation will be rejected by the republican—controlled senate and by president trump himself. david willis reports from washington. it is, in her words, a new dawn in american politics. 12 years ago, nancy pelosi made history as the first woman elected speaker of the house of representatives. now, she has staged an equally historic comeback to lead the first democratic majority there since 2010. two months ago, the american people spoke and demanded a new dawn. they called upon the beauty of our constitution and our system of checks and balances that
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protects our democracy. but the smiles belie a bitterly divided political landscape and two parties who can't even agree on the funding needed to keep the federal government open. at the heart of the stand—off, is president trump's demand for $5 billion for a wall along the mexican border — his signature issue on the campaign trail. he took to the white house briefing room for the first time, flanked by border patrol agents, and having congratulated nancy pelosi, vowed there would be no backing down over the wall. you can call it a barrier. you can call it whatever you want. but, essentially, we need protection in our country. we're going to make it good. the people of our country want it. i have never had so much support as i have the last week over my stance for border security, for border control, and for, frankly, the wall or the barrier.
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one of the first things the democratic controlled house voted on the was funding that would reopen those government departments that are currently embroiled in the shutdown. but the measures included no funding for the wall, which democrats see as the repudiation of the very principles on which this country was built. a wall is an immorality. it is not who we are as a nation. and this is not a wall between mexico and the united states that the president is creating here. it's a wall between reality and his constituents. but the partial shutdown is its first and highly pressing challenge. another meeting is due later today at the white house, involving the president and congressional leaders. but there is no resolution in sight, some two weeks after the shutdown began. china has confirmed that it
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will host trade talks with the united states next week, as nervousness continues on global stock markets. they will be the first face—to—face discussions since presidents xijinping and donald trump declared a ninety—day truce in their trade war in early december. the winners of a euromillions jackpot of almost £115 million have been revealed as frances and patrick connolly from moira in county armagh. it is the fourth biggest euromillions win in the uk. our correspondent chris page was at the press conference where the couple spoke about their win for the first time. you can see the champagne has been flowing here, they have been speaking to the media here at a hotel on the outskirts of belfast. they do say they are still pretty short than that perhaps it still hasn't quite sunk in yet. they say, no matter what the months ahead do hold, they are looking
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forward, first and foremost, to giving away some of that money to 50, they say, family and friends. they have made a list and they are going to help them out. also, enjoy a few holidays, buy a new car travel abroad to watch formula one — so, plenty of plans. they have been telling us all about it at a news conference here in the last hour. i also believed that there could be lots of winners in other countries. so, even though it said it and you got the information in front of you — you still couldn't believe it? obviously, you are sat there and you think that you might have won almost £115 million. and he kept repeating that. and the numbers, you said, he kept repeating over and over again. can i say — the 70p left off the cheque is really, really important to him! don't worry, it's in the account. that's ok then. so you sat there and then you say that you went to bed? well, we tried. it was about three o'clock in the morning? 20 minutes later, i was back downstairs. i think you had an hour later on? just trying to rest. were you lying there thinking how
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you're going to spend it — it's a huge amount of money. what were you doing? what were your thoughts? when the e—mail came through and we started talking to each other, this is kind of real. you're asking us, do we believe it? we are not stupid. but believing it in your head and acknowledging it as meaning anything is different. it didn't mean actually anything at that point. we started saying, the only thing we have done is make a list of all the people that we are going to give money to. instead of going onto the internet and looking at the biggest house you could buy, shopping trips, holidays, all those things. you say that you sat down there and wrote a list? like everyone else in the county, we have sat at a table, every now and again, and says, what would we do if we win? if we won £1 million,
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i would have it spent before it was in the bank because i knew the house i was going to buy, the cars, how much money the kids were going to get— not a bother. but this was... it was different. immediately, the list was made. so this is a physical list of people that you are going to share the money with? how many people are on the list? at the moment, about 50. you have a list of 50 people? you're going to make more millionaires? definitely not. do they know? no. how are you going to tell them? the fun bit for us... like it is a on television to give
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it away but it is going to be so which funds. that was the first thing i knew i was going to do. the second thing i have to do was to stop them from tearing up the list. it works in my favour because it's such a big amount of money. i want to go and see people's faces. the pleasure for me will be seeing their faces and asking them what we can do for them. how quickly are you doing that? are you starting now? some straightaway. we have three daughters and grandchildren, they will at least get something straightaway. we have to have time to get the money and get it into the proper bank accounts, all that kind of practical stuff. it may take a month before we can really do anything major for people. but, as soon as we can. have worked out how you will tell them? we thought a little bit but we will sort of wing it. definitely face—to—face. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with simon king. good morning. some others are local toa good morning. some others are local to a frost was morning. temperatures down to —3, minus four degrees. it is here today where you will get solar spells. elsewhere, there is quite a bit of cloud around. temperatures are about 7—8d in northern scotland and northern scotland. boswell, temperatures will be between 3—7d. through the night, there will be available commands of plants. we get clear spells, there will be patchy forced into the weekend. where you keep the cloud, temperatures just stay above
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freezing. starting off the weekend ona freezing. starting off the weekend on a rather chilly note. some sunny spells around but, generally speaking, temperatures are going up by sunday to about 7—10d. goodbye. hello this is bbc newsroom live with anita mcveigh. the headlines: parents are told to worry less about their children spending time looking at screens, as experts say there is little evidence it is harmful to their health. there are harms from screens, but actually, screens bring us great opportunities and we have to balance those. the first x—ray scanner is intalled in a prison in england, as police say there's evidence members of criminal gangs get prison jobs to smuggle in drugs. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen. uk house prices grew at the slowest annual rate last month since february 2013, according to nationwide building society. a couple from northern ireland
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who won the fourth—biggest uk euromillions prize, almost £115 million, say they've written a list of 50 family and friends to share their fortune with. university bosses are warning that a no—deal brexit could be one of the biggest ever threats to higher education. the government says it'll guarantee money for eu—funded projects if a deal isn't reached. but university vice—chancellors say leaving the eu without an agreement could disrupt world—leading research and put billions of pounds of funding at risk. with me now is professor paul boyle, president and vice—chancellor of the university of leicester. good afternoon to you. tell us how
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you think the university of leicester might be affected if the uk leads the eu without a deal? obviously, universities are inherently international. we attract staff from europe and the rest of the world. we attract students from europe and are involved in a wide range of research collaborations. one example of a major research project we led here, a £60 million project we led here, a £60 million project looking at asthma, this created the first new asthma drug in 20 years across the world, and it was done through a grant from the eu, and major project involving many countries. that type is what leads to the sort of advances we desperately required to help our health. the government says it will guarantee funding if a deal isn't reached, does that offer you some reassurance? we are of course pleased that the government has taken such a positive stance over supporting such grants if we do
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leave. the thing is, some funding streams exist where that won't be possible. the most prestigious funding grant scheme, possibly in the world, that we participate in at the world, that we participate in at the moment, if we leave europe with no deal, we will no longer be able to access that particular scheme, and that will make a huge difference. and notjust about covering expected funding, it's about those future projects that wouldn't be covered by the government assurance? absolutely. we have three broad threats of funding —— threads of funding. funding that is yet to start, that is in more difficult position. and then there are the grants were preparing for, they are prepared many years in advance working with teams across the world, and that means preparation is vital. you and fellow
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vice chancellors have written a letter to mps on this subject. in a nutshell, what are you saying to those mps, what do you think will happen to the future of uk universities, their rotation, the work there able to do if tellies europe without a deal? so much of what we do is about international collaboration, we must maintain that ability to collaborate with the best scientists in the world. must also be able to welcome the best scientists into this country. many of our nobel laureates are rejoined from mainland europe. ithink the government understands that, they realise we are relying on this and there is room for optimism, both barnier and may have said they want to continue to collaborate on research and innovation. but if we end up with a no deal, that could be jeopardised. thank you very much.
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new research suggests that patients are made to wait twice as long for an ambulance when 999 is dialled from a doctor's surgery. it's according to a response to a freedom of information request from ten of the 13 ambulance services across the uk. ambulance bosses insist all calls are prioritised on clinical need. let's get more on that story about prisons now, about the first first x—ray scanner that's been installed in a prison in england, as part of the government's programme to reduce drug—related violence. it can detect packages hidden inside a prisoner's body. earlier i spoke to mark fairhurst, who's the national chair of the prison officers' association. he told me he thinks the scanners are a vital resource in the fight against drugs in prisons. this is one of a body of measures that we can use to prevent illicit items coming into ourjails. there's only going to be ten jails that have these body scanners. we want them in all presence, and we want everyone entering
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a prison, including staff and visitors, going through these scanners and being searched thoroughly, like you do at an airport. i also spoke to frances crook, who's the chief executive of the howard league for penal reform. she was more sceptical about whether these scanners will be effective. the trouble is that if you're saying it's like an airport, at an airport, everybody is scanned — staff, visitors, everybody. the problem in what they have in leeds is one machine, where they're going to do some of the prisoners, some of the time. so i think we're looking to technology to solve a much more complicated problem and i don't think it's really going to be a big part of the solution. reports from germany say hundreds of german politicians have had their personal details hacked and published online. the information, including contact details and credit card numbers, was posted on a twitter account in the form of an advent calendar, with a link to more information posted each day in the run—up to christmas. victims include the president frank—walter steinmeier and members from all parties, except the main opposition party, the right—wing alternative for germany. there's also speculation that state—sponsored
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hackers may have got into the politicians' e—mail accounts. earlier i spoke to our correspondent damien mcguinness, who's in berlin for us. i started by asking him how serious this is, in terms of compromising the safety and security of these politicians. this is the largest data leak that germany has ever experienced. it's incredibly serious when you consider that this is extremely sensitive and personal information. it ranges from family photos, private correspondence, e—mails, messages between family members and politicians — right through to banking and financial information. as you say, the president has been affected, the whole german government cabinet has been affected. angela merkel herself has been affected — e—mail information of hers has been released, private letters and correspondence has been leaked. so it's incredibly personal information, including addresses and contact information. so it depends what could be done with that information, in terms of safety and security. it's also very important
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because it's hit almost a whole sector of society in germany. it's gone right through germany's political leadership. every single political party, apart from the right—wing populist alternative for germany party, has been hit. also quite prominentjournalists, prominent tv personalities, such as the very famous tv comedian jan bohmermann have been affected. some musicians, some rappers. what they all have in common is that they are all, generally, quite politically active. they express a lot of political opinions. for example, the comedian has been very critical of right—wing populism. the rappers have been very supportive of certain left—wing issues. that has led to some speculation that there is some sort of political link or motivation. so far, there is no evidence who is behind this attack but there is speculation that there might be some sort of link with german right—wing extremists. or alternatively, that there could be some sort of connection
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with state actors, or individuals even, in russia or china. but so far, investigations are still carrying on and there is no evidence as to who is actually behind this attack, or why they carried it out. we can return to our main news now — the first uk guidance about screen use by children and the advice that might suprise some parents that they shouldn't necessarily be cutting down on their kids screen time. first, let's hear what some parents have been saying about screen time. they do have ipads, but they're only allowed them to use them during school holidays. during term time, they're locked away. we limited for a certain time. he has to get off and read books. i don't think they should be on it so long. they always say, please, can i have more time? they should be playing with electronic devices, they are part of the world and it's important to keep pace with the world. but they also need to figure out how things work for themselves as well. it's impossible to take ipads from young children.
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however, i do think you can monitor the amount of time they spend on it. you need to make sure you don't use it as a baby—sitter. we're quite mindful because we both wear specs. we're mifdul we don't want them to get strained eyes. and they're tools of the future, so they need to learn. they're a bit faster than us, aren't they? yeah! the announcement of the guidance comes as another study conducted by ucl into social media suggests a link between level of usage and depressive symptons in teenagers, particularly girls. the research found that girls were at a much higher rate of depression than boys, which was put down to the greater time they spend on social media. online bullying and poor sleep are the main culprits for their low mood according to the study. with me now is yvonne kelly, who conducted the study and leads work on health and development during childhood and adolescence. it's really good to have you here on
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the bbc news channel. this study is based on interviews with almost 11,014 —year—olds. based on interviews with almost 11 , 014 —year—olds. on based on interviews with almost 11,014 —year—olds. on your words, what did you find. —— 11,000 14—year—olds. what did you find. —— 11,000 14-year-olds. the more time young people spend online the more likely they are to display depressive symptoms. and pathways between social media use and depression appear to be to do with sleep. so young people not getting enough sleep, getting more disrupted, having problems getting to sleep and there online experiences around harassment and bullying. so this could be negative comparisons with others, feeling they don't match up to whatever they aspire to be?”
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would also be a factor, we selected self—esteem and body image. would also be a factor, we selected self-esteem and body image. you speak about the amount of time spent on social media and the colouration between that and those findings in the context of the report we have already spoken about at length today, which is not specifically looking at social media, but that plus games and other things kids spend time on the screen is doing. but this gives context, because a lot of people have said today they didn't feel there was a lot of guidance in that report and the want that guidance? the report was about screen is largely, but we were able to focus on social media use alarm pack what is going on there. our study looks at possible explanation is that link social media use with a depressive symptoms. so is your study seeking to give guidance or is it only focusing on gathering a
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basic fact to begin with? if there was one primary piece of evidence, given ourfindings of was one primary piece of evidence, given our findings of linking sleep to depression, it would be in relation to social media. remove those mobile devices from the bedroom. that ties in with this report that says no screen time and therefore by extension, no social media for an hour before bedtime. don't think we can say anything about the amount of time spent on screens because we have to think carefully about what's going on. a few engaging edifying precedes online, that is different from perhaps encountering negative experience or images that make you feel bad about your perceptions of your own body image, for example. young people have very, very different experiences online. it's about the experience and content of
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their engagement on social media as much as anything else, not necessarily the number of hours they spend doing it. thank you very much for your time today. on the 22nd of february 1944, a us bomber crashed in a park in sheffield, with the loss of all ten crew on—board. one man who witnessed the tragedy has been tending to their memorial ever since. tony foulds was just eight years old at the time. he hopes that this year's 75th anniversary will be marked by a fly—past in honour of those who lost their lives. dan walker has been to meet him. we saw this plane circle, it was just over the rooftops. as it came over, we don't know whether it were a pilot or a bomb. on that front side, it went like this. we waved back, eight years old, they were wanting us to get
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up the grass. you look this way, there's thousands of houses there and the other side is behind us, where they crash—landed, thousands more houses going down to the city centre. this is the only bit of green they could have landed. this is it. he decided to fly that way. as he did, he decided to go over the trees. the next thing we knew, boom. and i thought, you know, good gracious. i could have not been here if those lad hadn't gave their lives. this is what you been looking after for all these years, tony? yeah. how do you feel standing here now? the first thing of course is always kiss them first. and i start talking. "it's not very nice today. "you won't like it
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when it's like this." then we go on about my shopping. you know, i know people who pass think i'm daft. i don't think you're daft, by the way, tony. i can see your hands shaking, you have tremors. essential tremors, for many, many years. as long as i'm alive. i'll never stop. that, i can swear, i will never stop. does the guilt get any easier to deal with? do you still feel guilty now? yeah, never will get any easier. your dedication means a lot to an awful lot of people. the fact that you care makes an awful lot of people care as well. thank you, yeah. how often do you think about that sacrifice?
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every day, every single day. for you, it's about these ten men and their families. i know what you do want, is to make sure that on that 75th anniversary, on the 22nd of february this year, you would love some sort of fly—past to mark the occasion. why is that so important? because this is a tribute that they deserve, they deserve it. what a moving story there. the headlines on bbc news: there is little evidence screentime is harmful to children's health, as leading paediatricians tell parents to worry less. police say there is growing evidence that members of organised criminal gangs getjobs in prisons to smuggle in drugs, as the first x—ray scanner is installed in a prison in england. the foreign office confirms that paul whelan, a former us marine
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accused of spying in russia, is also a british citizen. a usjudge has rejected the singer ed sheeran's call for a legal case accusing him of copying parts of marvin gaye's let's get it on to be dropped. in his decision, district judge louis stanton said a jury should decide, adding that he found substantial similarities between several of the musical elements in the two works. well, ed sheeran denies ripping off sections of marvin gaye's song for his number—one hit, thinking out loud. let's have a listen to that song by ed sheeran now. # will your mouth still remember the taste of my love? # will your eyes still smile from your cheeks? # darling, iwill your cheeks? # darling, i will be loving you till
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we're 70 #...#. that's ed sheeran's song, and now let's listen to marvin gaye's classic from 1973, let's get it on. # trying to hold back this feeling for so long # and if you feel like i feel, baby # and if you feel like i feel, baby # come on, oh, come on, ooh # come on, oh, come on, ooh # let's get it on... ...#. let's get more on this now from amanny mohamed, who's a broadcaster and critic on art and entertainment. good afternoon. do you think the two songs sound similar?” good afternoon. do you think the two songs sound similar? i think they sound quite similar, but when i first heard the song i didn't really think it was strikingly obvious. there are many songs that sound like many other songs, and it's arguable
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that how much creative license can one take? if you think of an idea in your head, how can you prove that it's yours? we all love songs, we are all inspired by art and music, essentially, things do get copied. i don't think it's particularly similar. it doesn't strike me as terribly obvious, but what's interesting is that ed sheeran's defence is that this marvin gaye song is more sexual in overtone and more racy, whereas his song is much more racy, whereas his song is much more about long—term relationships and melancholic and is slower. so you do really have tillerson quite ha rd to you do really have tillerson quite hard to hear the similarities. and you also have it to ask the question, where do you define the border between influence and copying? absolutely. there are so
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many songs that sound similar. we can't deny that at all. what's interesting about this is that the same lawyer has just represented the marvin gaye estate and has won against other artists. this was a case that was ongoing for 2.5 years, and they won this case. the lawyer is now after ed sheeran for the same kind of thing and who knows, maybe people get what he wants out of ed sheeran. personally, ithink people get what he wants out of ed sheeran. personally, i think ed sheeran. personally, i think ed sheeran is not unethical, so i would be hard pushed to believe he intentionally took the song and copied it. it's interesting the judge has bumped this decision to a jury? really interesting. thejury will have to decide whether the harmonic rhythm is as the same.
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what's in question here is the bass and percussion. when you submit, my understanding is, when use it a piece of music the copyright society in the uk, you do have to provide some kind of sheet music which shows each of the notes. so i think the jury, i'm wondering if they'll come from a musical background, whether they will have to compare the compositions of those two songs and actually really see note for note whether he's copied it or whether it just sounds similar. and you could argue that this race is quite common. now that this song is 40 yea rs common. now that this song is 40 years old, i'm sure there are other songs that sound similar. i am hard—pressed songs that sound similar. i am ha rd—pressed to believe songs that sound similar. i am hard—pressed to believe that ed did this deliberately, but he has also been sued by another set of artist
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recently, that was settled out of court. we must leave it there, sorry, running out of time. thank you forjoining us. i do wonder how musically qualified thatjury will be. if you feel you overindulged over christmas you might be considering cutting back on what you eat. if you're a meat lover would you consider turning vegetarian? john maguire has been looking at what impact cutting meat consumption has on our health and the environment. he's been to the west country to find out. whenjames small‘s family took over this farm in the mendip hills in somerset in 1945, meat was a luxury, not a daily right. so much has changed since. grass is the crop that we grow. obviously, as humans, we can't eat grass, so we keep livestock that can utilise grass and convert it to a protein that we can consume. but for those who consume their protein from plants, many have made an ethical decision, believing meat and dairy production to be unjust and unnecessary. but james small says welfare standards in britain are among the most stringent available. i think we do need to be aware of where our food comes from and,
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if we're going to consume meat, how that meat is produced. consumers, when out shopping, if they're looking to buy a british product, and preferably things with the red tractor stamp on it, they know that actually it's been produced to some of the best standards in the world. i'm driving half an hour north to bristol. the city's blazed a trail for meat—free foods. amandine cook opened a busy cafe three years ago. as a vegan, you can, not having to check all the ingredients on the menu, because we have a grocery section as well. you don't have to check the ingredients on the food you are buying. not all customers here issue meet but many do. i don't like eating animals, i can survive quite easily without doing it, so i don't. makes me far more guilty to eat them than it does to just not. yes, not wanting to contribute to the animal industry anymore because itjust makes me feel bad.
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there's also concern about the environmental impact. research published before christmas said around a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions come from food and more than half of that from animal products. and a team of agricultural economists from the university of bristol is asking, "what if everyone went vegan?" in a world first, they've planted wheat, good enough for bread, in a field normally used for grass. so, what do they expect to learn? the reason why we decided to do that was because we actually do not know at all what would happen if every single population, person in the population, becomes vegan and what would happen to ourfarm land. where grassland exists today, they are there for a reason and traditionally many farmers are using them because we cannot produce a lot of high quality, human edible crops there. so, what would happen if there is no need for our livestock for food production any more?
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farming is of course a business where supply aims to meet demand and our voracious appetites, whatever the diet. more chilly weather to come over the weekend. this morning the clouds broke up over some parts of england and wales, leading to prostate scenes, but we had some sunshine as well. it was —5 when this picture was taken. here in your place, it was taken. here in your place, it was as five. temperatures haven't changed a lot under those cloudy skies. take more feeding of the atla ntic skies. take more feeding of the atlantic into northern ireland and western scotland. more cloud into northern england and further south across england and wales. so mist and patchy frost around too, even across eastern areas of scotland
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once again. a chilly start to the weekend, frost in many places, fairly quiet, light winds for get most part, spells sunshine too. a chilly start for two weekends, particularly across eastern areas of the uk. that southwesterly breeze comes in, more cloud in western areas and wraps rain and drizzle as well. the breeze picking up through the day. some more cloud through the day, it temperatures only as high as 6 degrees. in the north west, a week weather fronts moving 6 degrees. in the north west, a week weatherfronts moving in, that means it all topples southwards, into any area of high pressure and fades away. some drizzle for a while in wales in the morning, the cloudier weather twitching in across the southern part of the uk, limiting the sunshine. sunnier skies across a
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good part of scotland, moving into northern england and ireland, before clouding up in the afternoon. temperatures not as low on sunday, double figures across some parts of england and wales. into next week, the weather changes a bit, i temperatures squeeze into the new continents, low pressure from the atla ntic continents, low pressure from the atlantic strengthening the winds across the northern half of the uk. northern scotland likely to see severe gales continuing into tuesday. but then the wind direction changes, a north—northwesterly winds, some showers as well, and briefly colder. child health experts say there's not enough evidence to show that screentime is harmful to children's health. they say parents are the bestjudge of how long their children should spend on smart phones and other devices but do recommend no screens for one hour before bed. even reading, which we think
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of as a really important thing, actually, is a bit of a sedentary occupation that can keep you up at night. so we think there is a balance to be struck. the royal college of paedeatrics and child health has called for more research into the impact of digital media given its evolving so rapidly. also this lunchtime.... fears that organised criminal gangs are applying forjobs in jails to smuggle drugs, say police. there are some examples of a staff, very soon after they work in a prison estate, whetherfor a prison officer or a prison worker, they
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